Category Archives: Noncompetes

So far this year, there have been 65 noncompete bills pending in 25 states — excluding the two pending federal noncompete bills, D.C.’s new law to ban most noncompetes, and any proposed bills that are circulating, but have not yet been filed. Five bills have died — leaving the current tally at 59 noncompete bills still pending in 21 states. Today’s post covers the three bills pending in Oregon.
So far this year, there have been 65 noncompete bills pending in 25 states — excluding the two pending federal noncompete bills, D.C.’s new law to ban most noncompetes, and any proposed bills that are circulating, but have not yet been filed. Five bills have died — leaving the current tally at 59 noncompete bills still pending in 21 states. Today’s post covers the three bills pending in New York, including New York’s late-breaking proposal to ban virtually all noncompetes.
So far this year, there have been 64 noncompete bills pending in 25 states — excluding the two pending federal noncompete bills, D.C.’s new law to ban most noncompetes, and any proposed bills that are circulating, but have not yet been filed. Five bills have died — leaving the current tally at 59 noncompete bills still pending in 21 states. Today’s post covers the four bills pending in Massachusetts.
Episode 5 of Fairly Competing is out! In this episode, Ben Fink, John Marsh, and I discuss the standards that apply and issues that arise when seeking or defending against an injunction in a trade secret or restrictive covenant case, and how they’ve been impacted by COVID. We also discuss the “Unicorn Case” and whether geographic restrictions make sense anymore.
So far this year, there have been 59 noncompete bills pending in 23 states1 — excluding the two pending federal noncompete bills, D.C.’s new law to ban most noncompetes, and any proposed bills that are circulating, but have not yet been filed. Four bills have already died — each in a state that had only one pending bill — leaving the current tally at 55 bills pending in 19 states. Today’s post covers the four bills pending in Minnesota.
Three and half months into 2021, and there have been 59 bills pending in 23 states (not counting 2 federal bills, a new DC law, or any proposed bills that are circulating, but have not yet been filed). Four bills have already died — each in a state that had only one pending bill — leaving the current tally at 55 bills pending in 19 states. Today’s post covers the two bills pending in Louisiana.
There are currently 45 state bills pending to modify noncompete law across 21 states — as well as two new federal bills, President Biden’s plan to limit the use of noncompetes, and the FTC’s consideration of regulatory limitations. Iowa has two pending bills.
There are currently 45 state bills pending to modify noncompete law across 21 states — as well as two new federal bills, President Biden’s plan to limit the use of noncompetes, and the FTC’s consideration of regulatory limitations. Iowa has significant legislative activity, including five publicly filed bills.
45 state bills to modify noncompete law are pending across 21 states. Sixteen of them propose to follow the trend of banning noncompetes for so-called “low-wage workers” (however that may be defined) and four propose total bans of employee noncompetes. In this series, we will be providing details on all 45 bills (and any new ones that are filed) — and we will be simultaneously updating our Changing Trade Secrets | Noncompete Laws page. Today’s installment covers the eight Connecticut bills.
Ben Fink, John Marsh, and I are pleased to announce the launch of Fairly Competing — a podcast providing in-depth analysis of trade secret law and the law of noncompetes and other restrictive covenants for a broad audience.
About twice a year, I update my chart of reported noncompete and trade secrets decisions. As regular readers of this blog know, a little over a decade ago, I became curious to see how many reported trade secret and noncompete decisions were issued each year in all of the federal and state courts around the country. So, I did a “back of the envelope” calculation. I have performed similar calculations every year since. Here is the latest.