Category Archives: Restrictive Covenants

The D.C. Council held two proceedings related to its recent noncompete ban last week. During both, at-Large Councilmember Elisa Silverman recommended pushing back the implementation date of the new law to April 1, 2022. During the hearing, the Council received wide-ranging testimony about a potential amendment: some objective, verifiable input and some partisan rhetoric; some spot on and some inaccurate. Now we wait.
This afternoon, President Biden signed an “Executive Order on Promoting Competition in the American Economy,” which included pushing for the regulation of noncompetes by the FTC. Based on his comments during today’s press conference (discussed in the post), we expect that any regulation will be balanced, focusing on regulating the abuses, rather than a throw-the-baby-out-with-the-bathwater wholesale ban.
Nevada too has modified its noncompete law. Effective October 1, 2021, among other things, noncompetes cannot be used for hourly workers and employers will be at risk of paying attorney’s fees for violating certain aspects of the law.
So far this year, there have been 65 noncompete bills pending in 25 states — excluding the two pending federal noncompete bills, D.C.’s new law to ban most noncompetes, and any proposed bills that are circulating, but have not yet been filed. Five bills have died — leaving the current tally at 59 noncompete bills still pending in 21 states. Today’s post covers the three bills pending in Oregon.
So far this year, there have been 65 noncompete bills pending in 25 states — excluding the two pending federal noncompete bills, D.C.’s new law to ban most noncompetes, and any proposed bills that are circulating, but have not yet been filed. Five bills have died — leaving the current tally at 59 noncompete bills still pending in 21 states. Today’s post covers the three bills pending in New York, including New York’s late-breaking proposal to ban virtually all noncompetes.
Ben Fink, John Marsh, and I are pleased to announce the launch of Fairly Competing — a podcast providing in-depth analysis of trade secret law and the law of noncompetes and other restrictive covenants for a broad audience.
What concept did President Obama, President-elect Biden, and 47 states – including every single state to consider the issue in the past decade – reject? A ban on noncompetes.

What bill did the Council of the District of Columbia Committee on Labor & Workforce Development just vote to approve? Yep: a ban on noncompetes.
Protecting trade secrets, confidential business information, goodwill, and any other recognized legitimate business interests does not happen by accident. Companies need to plan. And, when one of the key tools is taken away (i.e., noncompetes), they need to look more closely at the remaining options to ensure they have the protections they need and that fit their circumstances. We discuss them in this post.
As regular readers of this blog know, I focus on providing content, and don’t often suggest programs to attend. However, it just so happens that over the course of the next week, there are three programs that all provide some helpful insights, each in a different way. Take a look.