Tag Archives: California noncompete

Two new California laws will fundamentally alter the national noncompete landscape, effectively voiding other states’ laws and contracts, and adversely impacting companies’ ability to protect their trade secrets, confidential business information, customer goodwill, and other legitimate business interests. Join us and over 40 other lawyers for a roundtable brainstorming session.
Another anti-noncompete, anti-nonsolicit bill in California is now on the Governor’s desk. The bill says that California’s prohibition on restrictive covenants is to be read broadly and requires companies to notify employees subject to a covenant that violates that law that their restrictions are void and unenforceable. It operates retroactively and, not surprisingly, there are penalties.
Episode 12 of Fairly Competing is out! In this episode, Ben Fink, John Marsh, and I explore Wisk Aero LLC v. Archer Aviation Inc., an extremely well-reasoned decision offering an object lesson about preliminary injunctions in trade secret cases, highlighting that it’s no longer safe to assume you will get a preliminary injunction simply because a former employee downloaded 5,000 documents — even if he invokes the 5th Amendment.
With all of the changes at the state level (45 bills in 21 states, plus D.C.’s near-total ban, which is, as of yesterday, now officially adopted and pending funding, likely in the fall, it seems), the federal efforts — spearheaded by Senator Chris Murphy — continue to inch forward. During the Senate the confirmation hearing of Julie Su (currently the Secretary of the California Labor and Workforce Development Agency) for the position the Deputy Labor Secretary, Senator Chris Murphy reminds us that his bill to ban noncompetes is still in the works — and that, ultimately, he expects the FTC to regulate noncompetes.